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Invokana, a new drug used to treat Type 2 diabetes, and other similar drug types are coming under scrutiny from the medical and legal community for possible links to serious injuries including kidney failure, heart attack, stroke or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA).

If you or someone you know has experienced any of the above injuries while taking Invokana or any other sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) drugs, you may have a legal right to compensation for your injuries.

Contact us today to learn more about your legal right to file an Invokana lawsuit by calling 1-877-318-0580.

Invokana Risks

Over 450 adverse event reports linking serious side effects to the use of Invokana were filed with the U.S. Food & Drug Administration’s MedWatch Program during the first year the drug was on the market. Reports of Invokana injures were released in the May 2015 edition of Quarter Watch, the quarterly publication of The Institute for Safe Medication Practices. Of those, 54 were reports of kidney failure.

Health Canada’s safety review found a link between the use of SGLT2 inhibitors, including Invokana, and acute kidney injury, acute renal failure and renal failure. As a result, Health Canada is working with the drug’s manufacturers to add an update to Canadian prescribing information of Invokana, strengthening the wording to reflect the risk of acute kidney injury.

The FDA also recently issued a safety warning regarding Invokana’s increased risk of causing diabetic ketoacidosis, a condition resulting in too much acid in the blood which, in many cases, was serious enough to result in hospitalization. The FDA had also previously required Johnson & Johnson, the drug’s manufacturer, to conduct additional studies into the drug’s increased risk of cardiovascular events such as heart attack or stroke.

What is Invokana?

Invokana (canagliflozin) treats type 2 diabetics by inhibiting some kidney functions thereby increasing the amount of blood sugar passed through the urine. Invokana was brought to market in March 2013 by Johnson & Johnson (J&J) and quickly became a popular diabetes therapy drug amid an aggressive marketing campaign that has netted an estimated $650 million in sales.

While the FDA granted approval of the drug in early 2013, the drug’s early clinical trials revealed potentially serious side effects including the risk of patients having a heart attack within 30 days of starting the drug and an increased risk of having a stroke. The FDA required J&J to conduct five additional follow up studies which should be complete later in 2015. Despite this, J&J did not include these additional risks on Invokana’s label.

SGLT2 Drug Names

Invokana lawyers at Simmons Hanly Conroy are currently investigating the following SGLT2 drugs for links to serious injuries:

  • Invokana
  • Invokamet
  • Farxiga
  • Xigduo XR
  • Jardiance
  • Glyxambi

Invokana and other SGLT2 Drug Injuries

Since Invokana was first sold, nearly 450 adverse incident reports have been filed with the FDA’s MedWatch program. Patients who took the above SGLT2 drugs are reporting serious injuries, including the following:

  • Kidney failure
  • Heart attack
  • Stroke
  • Acidosis/diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA)

File an Invokana Lawsuit

As a result of the increased safety concerns, Invokana lawyers at Simmons Hanly Conroy are currently investigating potential claims of individuals who have taken Invokana to treat type 2 diabetes and other diabetic medicine in the class of drugs called, sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors.

If you or someone you know was injured while taking Invokana, you may be able to file an Invokana lawsuit. Tell us about your Invokana injury by filling out the form, and someone will contact you shortly about your legal rights.

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